Student Tips for Navigating Online Research Resources and Services

By Tom McLaughlin

Rutgers University–Camden’s libraries are closed – and operating remotely – due to social distancing guidelines. However, that doesn’t mean librarians aren’t available to provide research assistance.

Students who have a research or library-related question can email their subject librarian directly or chat with a librarian 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. daily.

Students who have a research or library-related question can email their subject librarian directly or chat with a librarian 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. daily.

“Doing library research can be stressful at any time, and not being able to visit the library building adds an additional challenge,” says Zara Wilkinson, reference librarian for the Paul Robeson Library at Rutgers University–Camden. “However, we want everyone to know that we are here to help! Librarians at Robeson can recommend library databases, help find sources for research papers, or track down course materials. Just let us know what you need.”

In addition, Wilkinson offers the following tips for navigating online research resources and services:

  • QuickSearch offers easy access to millions of articles, electronic books, and streaming media. QuickSearch is prominently located on the library’s website. You can make your search as broad or as narrow as you like, using the options on the left side of the screen to limit by date, resource type, language, and more.
  • If QuickSearch doesn’t have what you need, try one of hundreds of indexes and databases. You can browse alphabetically or by subject area, and our librarians would be happy to help identify databases that might be useful.

    Wilkinson reminds students that librarians at Paul Robeson Library are still there to help.

  • The libraries have been working hard to add new online books while our print collection is inaccessible. Just recently, we secured temporary access to 200,000 e-books via the EBSCOHost eBook Comprehensive Academic Collection; more than 600 e-books published by the Harvard Business Review Press; and more than 2,000 reference books published by Cambridge University Press.
  • Browse research guides created by our librarians. Research guides feature curated links to library resources, websites, tutorials, and other materials. (If you’re teaching a course and would like a research guide created for your students, contact your subject librarian.)
  • If you are looking for course materials that have been placed on electronic reserve, you can search our course reserves site by professor’s name, course name, or course number. (Faculty members can request to have e-books, articles, or streaming media placed on reserve using this form.)

“If you have anything checked out, don’t worry! The library is not accepting any returns right now. When we start receiving returned books, we’ll be waiving any late fees that were accrued during our COVID-19 closure,” says Wilkinson.

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