Rutgers Forensics Expert to Lead Workshops on Fingerprints for Free Library of Philadelphia Program

By Tom McLaughlin

Amateur detectives of all ages are invited to discover how fingerprints are used to catch criminals, as Rutgers University–Camden forensics expert Kimberlee Moran leads a series of fun and engaging workshops from Feb. 7 to March 13 at various branches of the Free Library of Philadelphia.

Moran, an associate teaching professor and director of forensics in the Department of Chemistry at Rutgers–Camden, will lead “What’s your Pattern? Fingerprints & Forensics” sessions in connection with the book The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time.

In the book, this year’s selected book for the “One Book, One Philadelphia” program, the story centers around Christopher, an autistic teenager, who discovers that the neighbor’s dog is dead. Christopher is determined to solve the mystery and draws inspiration from the likes of Sherlock Holmes.

Moran will cover the various types of fingerprints, how identifications are made, and how to dust and lift fingerprints. Participants will even get to practice a few different techniques themselves.

“Fingerprinting and forensic science go hand in hand,” says Moran. “The magic of watching prints appear with a little powder is a great way to introduce the use of science to solve crime.”

Moran adds that guests will be learning about the first forensic science, which is still in use today.

“So come play with powders and learn what makes your patterns uniquely you,” she says.

The forensics workshops will be held in Philadelphia as follows:

Tuesday, Feb. 7, 4:30 p.m.

Haddington Branch, located at 446 North 65th Street

Wednesday, Feb. 22, 10 a.m.

Independence Branch, located at 18 South 7th Street

Tuesday, Feb 28, 3:30 p.m.

Kingsessing Branch, located at 1201 South 51st Street

Monday, March 6, 3:30 p.m.

Overbrook Park Branch, located at 7422 Woodbine Avenue

 Monday, March 13, 4:30 p.m.

Eastwick Neighborhood Branch, located at 2851 Island Avenue

For more information, visit freelibrary.org.

 

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